Visit Alò Bisujè in Sartenais Valinco Taravo

The prehistoric site of Alò Bisujè in Bilia, Sartenais Valinco Taravo (10 minutes from Sartène), is now open to the public. Originally unearthed in the 1960s by the famous archaeologist Roger Grosjean, these Bronze Age villages, important remnants of prehistoric Corsica, have undergone extensive conservation work over the last 10 years by François Sampieri and his wife Saveria, on whose land they are situated. The main structure at Alò Bisujè is an imposing tower built in the shape of a truncated cone, which probably once reached 4m in height. Walls, pottery and tools have also been unearthed; helping to give an idea of what life might have been like in the Bronze Age. After much hard work and perseverance, the dreams of the Sampieri family have finally come true.

Travel back in time several thousand years to prehistoric Corsica

 

Leaving the main road which leads down to the south of Corsica and heavy traffic, I follow a small road that winds through the woodland ahead of me. The blue of the sea contrasts with the greens and oranges of the autumn foliage. Alò Bisujè is to my right.

As I get out of the car, the smells of the woodland hit me - mastic trees, olive trees, strawberry trees and oaks. François, who runs the site, welcomes me and gives me some advice for my visit: ‘Go at your own pace and let your imagination run wild.’ Today, I have a date with history!

 

I head uphill by a small dirt road to the centre of the site.

 

Arriving out onto a headland overlooking the Senetosa lighthouse and Asinara Island, I spot the remains of an impressive ‘turra’ (tower), around 8m in circumference, affording unobstructed 360-degree views. Perhaps this was a strategic point from which to spot enemies approaching? Or some kind of storehouse?

Tools including an axe mould have been unearthed around this building, as well as stone walls forming the foundations of houses or workshops. The remains of the ‘Casteddu d'Alò’ are the silent witnesses to what our ancestors’ lives were like in Corsica thousands and thousands of years ago.

 

Life here would have revolved around hunting, arts and crafts, and culture. I come across the remains of a ‘proto turra’ dating from 2,200 BC, a prototype of what would end up as the ‘turra’ thousands of years later. Further on, I spot clusters of olive trees, originally brought to Corsica by the Greeks. Loaded with fruit this time of year, they watch over Alò Bisujè.

Life here would have revolved around hunting, arts and crafts, and culture. I come across the remains of a ‘proto turra’ dating from 2,200 BC, a prototype of what would end up as the ‘turra’ thousands of years later. Further on, I spot clusters of olive trees, originally brought to Corsica by the Greeks. Loaded with fruit this time of year, they watch over Alò Bisujè.

An emotive, educational experience that’s bound to make you think, a visit to Alò Bisujè is a must for all ages!

 

 

Restes d'habitation ©ATC Restes d'habitation ©ATC

 

Vue église San Ghjuvanni ©ATC Vue église San Ghjuvanni ©ATC

 

Menhirs ©ATC Menhirs ©ATC

 

Murs en pierres ©ATC Murs en pierres ©ATC

 

©ATC ©ATC

 

Turra ©ATC Turra ©ATC

 

Interieur Turra ©ATC Interieur Turra ©ATC

 

Live the experience with Sylvain and watch his video!

 

 

More information :

Open from April to October

Contact: +33 (0)6 82 66 32 26

 

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